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  • Spark and Echo Arts | Experience the Bible Illuminated

    Experience the Bible Illuminated. A modern gallery of honest expression from artists deeply engaged with Scripture. Start Exploring Welcome to this NEW 2024 beta version of our site. Please bear with us as we iron out some minor issues. We hope that you'll check back often – to see the on-going development, and to continue experiencing the Bible through art in your everyday life. The Bible Sparks Inspiration. Enlightenment. Challenge. Interruption. Examination Comfort. Provision. Healing. Satisfaction. Rest. When we encounter it... We listen. We respond. We create. We echo. View Full Gallery In response to Obadiah 1:21, photographer Allison Daniell Moix offers this work as in thoughtful and vulnerable reflection. Obadiah 1:21 A New Language Featured Art View This Art Allison Daniell Moix What Is Illumination? Yesterday's illustrated manuscripts and story-telling stained glass open new avenues of expression to today's culture. Why This Project Matters Melissa, TN "I never imagined something like this could exist. You've transformed how I view my favorite passages." Abby, CA "The discussion and energy that this has generated has been nothing short of phenomenal. I can't tell you what a breath of fresh air this is." John, PA "I've needed something like this for so long to re-ignite my desire and passion for Scripture. The expression of these artists is giving voice to my heart." There are 31,102 verses in the Bible. 28,858 still need illuminated. Our Goal: Illuminate the Whole Bible. Get Involved CONNECT Join our mailing list for news and updates as we grow. CREATE Join our growing list of artists to be selected to illuminate a passage. GIVE We rely entirely on the generous support of our donors. Any amount helps. Donate Today! SHARE Who needs to know about Spark & Echo? Spread the Word far and wide. COPIED! Paste to share in social or email! Copy www.sparkandecho.com Artist in Residence 2015: Melissa Beck Part 1 Proverbs 19:20-21 Artist in Residence 2015: Melissa Beck Part 2 Isaiah 50:6-8 Artist in Residence 2015: Melissa Beck Part 3 Exodus 28:1-5 Artist in Residence 2015: Melissa Beck Part 4 Isaiah 50:7 Eve's Song Genesis 2:21-24 Caves and Echoes 1 Samuel 24:3-7 2020 Artist in Residence: Marlanda Dekine Job 10:10-12:8 A Clean Heart, O God! Psalms 51:11 Haggai 2 Haggai 2 ALMA No 5 1 Timothy 6:1-21 A Study in Lying Ecclesiastes 4:10-11 Memories Ecclesiastes 9:5-7

  • Artists in Residence | Spark & Echo Arts

    Artists In Residence Spark+Echo Artists in Residence spend a year developing and creating a major work in response to Scripture. The progression of their work is documented and displayed throughout, and the final work is showcased. View This Work 2020 Artist in Residence: Marlanda Dekine Marlanda Dekine 2020 View This Work Artist in Residence 2019: Lancelot Schaubert Lancelot Schaubert 2019 View This Work Artist in Residence 2018: Elias Popa Elias Popa 2018 View This Work Artist in Residence 2017: Aaron Beaumont Aaron Beaumont 2017 View This Work Artist in Residence 2017: Lily Maase Lily Maase 2017 View This Work Artist in Residence 2016: Chris Knight Chris Knight 2016 View This Work Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle Stephanie Miracle 2016 View This Work Artist in Residence 2016: Lauren Ferebee Lauren Ferebee 2016 View This Work Artist in Residence 2016: Ebitenyefa Baralaye – "Bam Bam" Ebitenyefa Baralaye 2016 View This Work Artist in Residence 2015: Spark & Echo Band The Spark & Echo Band 2015 View This Work Artist in Residence 2015: Jason DaSilva Jason DaSilva 2015 View This Work Artist in Residence 2015: Melissa Beck Melissa Beck 2015 View This Work Artist in Residence 2015: Don Nguyen Don Nguyen 2015 View This Work Artist in Residence 2015: Christine Suarez Christine Suarez 2015 View This Work Artist in Residence 2015: Benje Daneman Benje Daneman 2015 View This Work Artist in Residence 2013, Emily Ruth Hazel Emily Ruth Hazel 2013 View This Work Memories Nicora Gangi 2013

  • Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle Part 3

    Loading Video . . . The phrase “a chasing after the wind” occurs five times within the passages I have selected. This short dance video was created in reflection to that phrase. My creative process is about responsiveness rather than execution. In my first post for this residency I wrote out a clear artistic goals for myself. Find the complete progression of the work linked below. Ecclesiastes 1:8-18 Ecclesiastes 2:17-26 Ecclesiastes 3:11 Ecclesiastes 6:7-12 Ecclesiastes 8:6-17 Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle Part 3 By Stephanie Miracle ​ Credits: ​ Curated by: Spark+Echo Arts, Artist in Residence 2016 2016 ​ ​ Dance Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ September 19, 2016 The phrase “a chasing after the wind” occurs five times within the passages I have selected. This short dance video was created in reflection to that phrase. My creative process is about responsiveness rather than execution. In my first post for this residency I wrote out a clear artistic goals for myself. But over these several months I can see that my work takes a less direct path. For all of the work in progress videos I had intended to use locations near my home in Essen, Germany; but while at an artist residency in Ghent, NY I spent several days collecting video of me dancing in the fields. After looking at the material I began to see a connection to the texts in Ecclesiastes and it sent me on a journey of questions: Is chasing after the wind a bad thing? Is it meaningless in that is cannot see what you are after?> Is it meaningless because it is un-catch able? What or who is the wind? Is the wind strong or gentle and thin? Should the wind move us? In this video I am seeking after something, something that is not seen. My movement is often passive, not extremely vigorous. I see that I am grasping at something. I move the camera in search of “it”. The days I worked in the fields the air was thin. I did not have much to clutch. I did not feel the wind on my skin or through the trees. Where did you go, wind? from Stephanie Miracle on Vimeo . Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Stephanie Miracle is an American born independent choreographer and performer currently based in Essen, Germany with her husband visual artist Jimmy Miracle. She earned her MFA in Dance at the University of Maryland and a BA in Dance from Belhaven University. She is also a teacher of Klein Technique™ and holds prestigious honor of being a 2014/15 German Fulbright Fellow in the Performing Arts. In 2015 she joined as a full-time dancer with the Folkwang Tanzstudio/FTS. In addition to performing with the company she often works in collaboration with Henrietta Horn (DE), Carla Jordao (PT), Ana Farfan (MX), Paola Ponti, (IT) and Anna Shchkleina (RU). She is the director of Fakers Club, a site-specific performance experiment based on film and serial television. Stephanie's choreography has been described as “iconic and nuanced…with an irreverence that makes you smile unconsciously”(Rick Westerkamp, 2014). Often in vivid technicolor, Miracle’s works are crafted with a cinematic sensibility and follow subtle narrative threads. In addition to creating choreographies for traditional proscenium theaters her unique aesthetic finds special significance in common spaces for example, parking lots, bus stops, woman's prisons, hallways, staircases, and rooftops. in Germany, Hungary, Mexico, Russia, New York City, and Washington DC by various institutions including MetLife Foundation, Exchange Festival, Dance Place, Supernoval Festival, Open Look Festival, Performatica, Belhaven University, ES WIRD SOGAR SCHÖN, Barnes Crossing, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. Other awards include the Smith Scholarship Grant to attend ImPulsTanz in 2012, dance artist-in-residence at OMI International Residency 2012, DC Innovation grant in 2013, Bates Dance Festival Merit Scholarship 2013, Goldhaber Travel Scholarship 2014, and NextNOW new work grant 2014. Her collaborative piece “Drafting Plan” was awarded Best Duo at Barnes Crossing Festival 2015 in Cologne and at the 2016 SzoloDuo Festival in Budapest. She is honored to be a 2016 Artist in Residence at Spark and Echo Arts. Website Stephanie Miracle About the Artist Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle Part 1 Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle Part 2 Treasure Heart Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle Stephanie Miracle Other Works By Follow the developmental journey of Stephanie's project by reading her first , second , and final post as a 2016 Artist in Residence. I have seen all the things that are done under the sun; all of them are meaningless, a chasing after the wind. What is crooked cannot be straightened; what is lacking cannot be counted. I said to myself, “Look, I have increased in wisdom more than anyone who has ruled over Jerusalem before me; I have experienced much of wisdom and knowledge.” Then I applied myself to the understanding of wisdom, and also of madness and folly, but I learned that this, too, is a chasing after the wind. For with much wisdom comes much sorrow;the more knowledge, the more grief. (Ecclesiastes 1:14-18) Everyone’s toil is for their mouth, yet their appetite is never satisfied. What advantage have the wise over fools? What do the poor gain by knowing how to conduct themselves before others? Better what the eye sees than the roving of the appetite. This too is meaningless, a chasing after the wind. (Ecclesiastes 6:7-9) Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle

    smiracle-4th-3.jpg Loading Video . . . Responding to Ecclesiastes 1:8-18; 2:17-26; 3:11; 6:7-12; 8:6-17, 2016 Artist in Residence Stephanie Miracle chronicles the unfolding of her project's final performance for a beautifully unexpected audience. Ecclesiastes 1:8-18 Ecclesiastes 2:17-26 Ecclesiastes 3:11 Ecclesiastes 6:7-12 Ecclesiastes 8:6-17 Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle By Stephanie Miracle ​ Credits: Title: “3, 2, 1, the future.” Photos by Dominque Chabot Curated by: Spark+Echo Arts, Artist in Residence 2016 2016 ​ ​ Dance Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ For there is a proper time and procedure for every matter, though a person may be weighed down by misery. Since no one knows the future, who can tell someone else what is to come? As no one has power over the wind to contain it, so no one has power over the time of their death. As no one is discharged in time of war, so wickedness will not release those who practice it. (Ecclesiastes 8:6-8) It was November 26. A typical monochromatic winter afternoon in Germany, drizzling rain and unpleasantly cold. Huddled together waiting for the bus I stood with my group of ten performers hailing from France, Japan, Singapore, Taiwan, Germany, and Italy. The city bus arrived. We piled and were transported further away from the city into the winding country side of horse pastures and mustard fields. On our journey we exchanged nervous, excited questions about the place we were going and the people we were to meet. Our destination was a newly constructed refugee welcome center just 20 minutes up the hill from us. It was designed to temporarily house up to 700 refugees before placing them in permanent residential units across various cities all over Germany. Our invitation was to to present was a kind of "welcome" and "here is something to enjoy while you wait" performance. I had been asked to create a piece of choreography for this event back in October when I was contemplating my final post for this Spark and Echo residency. Originally I had set a goal of making two dance films based on the selected passages from Ecclesiastes. One was to be a solo and the other a Fakers Club performance in a public space. My 2nd and 3rd posts are variations on these ideas but for my final posting I no longer felt compelled to push in this initial direction. When the opportunity to create something for the refugee camp arose I decided to shift my focus in this direction for the final posting. Working with the last passage from my selection of Ecclesiastes 8:6-17, I took inspiration from ideas of time, future, power, meaninglessness, misery, seeing, wisdom, understanding, what is fair and unfair, and joy. We arrived at the complex of building several hours before the schedule performance. First step was to get through security. The refugee building was under very strong protection and entrance required a criminal background check plus lots of paperwork. Patience was difficult to muster with so much anticipation surrounding the event. Once cleared we wound our way through a network of buildings to the enormous mess hall characterized by a shiny, stainless steel industrial kitchen and hundreds of pine tables, chairs and matching plywood walls. We cleared an area of the space to create a makeshift stage. Families with young children, men young and old trickled in and shuffled around to find a seat they liked. The performers also found a seat in the "audience" area. All together about 200 people waited in silence, staring at an empty space. Photo from "3, 2, 1, the future." And then orchestral music begins to swell. One by one the performers stand up on their chairs among the audience. The performers call out each other's names and begin pass a glowing blue ball above the audience. The music shifts to Afro-Funk and a wild game of toss explodes. The children go nuts. Seamlessly the ball disappears but the game continues and intensifies with an invisible ball. The performers jump and tumble all through the space, catching and passing the imaginary ball. The music stops everyone freezes. The performers slowly and quietly return to their chairs. The audience is trying to contain the giddiness the sport just stirred up. Two girls begin to whisper to each other across the room. They crawl out of their chairs and meet. The other performers come to find them and carry the two girls overhead. As their conversation continues they are floated above audience heads. A new person is picked up and transported through the space as the discussion continues. The group congregates and bodies assemble together to form a house like structure. One girl explores the house as a thunderstorm soundtrack plays in the background. The house of bodies collapses around her. Out of the rubble it rises again and lifts her up on its shoulders. She find pulls out a small bottle in her pocket, looks at it carefully and begins to blow the bubbles through the air. The children gasp with glee. The performers reach out to gently catch the bubbles and they transform into glass marbles. The clunk of marbles hitting the floor relates the silent burst of a thin soapy sphere. One man begins to collect all the marbles one by one. Momentarily halting the play. Who gets to have the marbles? For a tiny moment time is suspended. The man with the marbles looks around and begins to place one in the hands of audience members. The performers return to their seats and dance miniatures dances with the marble. So small they are only intended for people sitting closest to them. The music quiets and everything returns to stillness. Long after the performance the young and old continue to roll the small marble gifted to them through their fingers. Photo from "3, 2, 1, the future." I have almost no documentation of this final project in the series. The reason being security measures meant that video was completely prohibited and only few people were authorized to take photos. Although we have more photos available we are not allowed to use them because the faces of the audience are recognizable. Because most of our performance was intended to be in, among, and through the audience nearly all of our photos have faces of refugees in them. The photos I am posting here are permissible for use. Like all time-based performances, this piece disappeared almost instantly after it emerged. What lingered were only the smiles and beaming eyes. A feeling of joy hovered. It is hard for me to discuss dances in verbal language because I am more interested in visceral and emotional gut reactions. This is why I was drawn to the passages of Ecclesiastes originally. Because I feel the writers ideas through his language. I feel his frustration and confusion and joy and release. The writing is circular and moving around. Not landing on a final answer. It attempts comprehension but finds that it can't. It can't understand. I feels disappointing, absurd and hopeless. Yet in the end it feel that the writer focuses on joy. While studying this final passage in my Spark and Echo series I was reminded of another verse in scripture. "At that time Jesus, full of joy through the Holy Spirit, said, "I praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and learned, and revealed them to little children. Yes, Father, for this is what you were pleased to do." ( Luke 10:21 ) Photo from "3, 2, 1, the future." After our small performance vanished it was the laughter of the children that remained. And at the end of my year long residency it is the joyful promise that what is hidden and confused and darkened will be revealed to little children that remains with me. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Stephanie Miracle is an American born independent choreographer and performer currently based in Essen, Germany with her husband visual artist Jimmy Miracle. She earned her MFA in Dance at the University of Maryland and a BA in Dance from Belhaven University. She is also a teacher of Klein Technique™ and holds prestigious honor of being a 2014/15 German Fulbright Fellow in the Performing Arts. In 2015 she joined as a full-time dancer with the Folkwang Tanzstudio/FTS. In addition to performing with the company she often works in collaboration with Henrietta Horn (DE), Carla Jordao (PT), Ana Farfan (MX), Paola Ponti, (IT) and Anna Shchkleina (RU). She is the director of Fakers Club, a site-specific performance experiment based on film and serial television. Stephanie's choreography has been described as “iconic and nuanced…with an irreverence that makes you smile unconsciously”(Rick Westerkamp, 2014). Often in vivid technicolor, Miracle’s works are crafted with a cinematic sensibility and follow subtle narrative threads. In addition to creating choreographies for traditional proscenium theaters her unique aesthetic finds special significance in common spaces for example, parking lots, bus stops, woman's prisons, hallways, staircases, and rooftops. in Germany, Hungary, Mexico, Russia, New York City, and Washington DC by various institutions including MetLife Foundation, Exchange Festival, Dance Place, Supernoval Festival, Open Look Festival, Performatica, Belhaven University, ES WIRD SOGAR SCHÖN, Barnes Crossing, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. Other awards include the Smith Scholarship Grant to attend ImPulsTanz in 2012, dance artist-in-residence at OMI International Residency 2012, DC Innovation grant in 2013, Bates Dance Festival Merit Scholarship 2013, Goldhaber Travel Scholarship 2014, and NextNOW new work grant 2014. Her collaborative piece “Drafting Plan” was awarded Best Duo at Barnes Crossing Festival 2015 in Cologne and at the 2016 SzoloDuo Festival in Budapest. She is honored to be a 2016 Artist in Residence at Spark and Echo Arts. Website Stephanie Miracle About the Artist Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle Part 1 Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle Part 2 Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle Part 3 Treasure Heart Stephanie Miracle Other Works By Follow the developmental journey of Stephanie's project by reading her first , second , and third post as a 2016 Artist in Residence. Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • Art Gallery | Spark & Echo | Experience the Bible through Art

    Illuminations Gallery Filter by Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle Part 1 Ecclesiastes 1:8-18 Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle Part 2 Ecclesiastes 1:8-18 Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle Part 3 Ecclesiastes 1:8-18 The Capture, The Escape Jeremiah 13:20 The Mountain of the House of The Lord Matthew 1:5 I See Him but Not Now Joshua 2:1-24 So Shall Your Descendants Be Joshua 6:22-24 Artist in Residence 2015: Melissa Beck Part 1 Proverbs 19:20-21 Artist in Residence 2015: Melissa Beck Part 2 Isaiah 50:6-8 Artist in Residence 2015: Melissa Beck Part 3 Exodus 28:1-5 Artist in Residence 2015: Melissa Beck Part 4 Isaiah 50:7 Artist in Residence 2017: Lily Maase Part 1 Revelation 11:3-7 Artist in Residence 2017: Lily Maase Part 2 Revelation 9:10-20 Artist in Residence 2017: Lily Maase Part 3 Revelation 9:10-20 Artist in Residence 2016: Lauren Ferebee Part 1 Proverbs 8:32-36 Artist in Residence 2016: Lauren Ferebee Part 2 Proverbs 8:6-11 Artist in Residence 2016: Lauren Ferebee Part 3 Proverbs 8:17-21 Artist in Residence 2013, Emily Ruth Hazel Isaiah 50:2-3 Artist in Residence 2020, Sapient Soul (Marlanda Dekine) Job 10:10-12:8 Artist in Residence 2015: Jason DaSilva Part 3 Romans 12:2 Artist in Residence 2015: Jason DaSilva Part 2 Romans 12:2 Artist in Residence 2015: Jason DaSilva Part 1 Romans 12:2 Reflections on Water Isaiah 43:2 Artist in Residence 2018: Elias Popa Part 1 Job 38 Artist in Residence 2018: Elias Popa Part 2 Job 39 Artist in Residence 2018: Elias Popa Part 3 Job 40 Artist in Residence 2015: Don Nguyen Part 1 Luke 22:14-48 Artist in Residence 2015: Don Nguyen Part 2 Luke 22:14-48 Artist in Residence 2015: Don Nguyen Part 3 Luke 22:14-48 Artist in Residence 2015: Christine Suarez Part 2 Ruth 1:16-17 Artist in Residence 2015: Christine Suarez Part 3 Ruth 1:16-17 Artist in Residence 2015: Christine Suarez Part 1 Ruth 1:16-17 Artist in Residence 2016: Chris Knight Part 1 Ecclesiastes 1:8-13 Artist in Residence 2016: Chris Knight Part 2 Ecclesiastes 1:8-13 Artist in Residence 2016: Chris Knight Part 3 Ecclesiastes 1:8-13 Artist in Residence 2017: Aaron Beaumont - Part 3 Daniel 4 Artist in Residence 2017: Aaron Beaumont - Part 2 Daniel 4 Artist in Residence 2017: Aaron Beaumont - Part 1 Daniel 4 Artist in Residence 2019: Lancelot Schaubert - Part 3 Galatians 4:21-5:1 Artist in Residence 2019: Lancelot Schaubert - Part 2 Galatians 4:21-5:1 Artist in Residence 2019: Lancelot Schaubert - Part 1 Galatians 4:21-5:1 Artist in Residence 2016, Ebitenyefa Baralaye – Part 3 Romans 9:20-26 Artist in Residence 2016, Ebitenyefa Baralaye – Part 2 Romans 9:20-26 Artist in Residence 2016, Ebitenyefa Baralaye – Part 1 Romans 9:20-26 Winebibber Proverbs 1:10 Word of Mouth Isaiah 55:1-13 The Call Leviticus 3:16 The Cell Philemon 1:12-16 Load More

  • Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle Part 2

    Loading Video . . . I am sharing a working in progress video that shows my process of playing and pondering with some of the material we have been experimenting with over the past two months. I am not sure things are going in the direction I was expecting. That is part of the fun of it, I suppose. Being surprised by what is revealed. Find the complete progression of the work linked below. Ecclesiastes 1:8-18 Ecclesiastes 2:17-26 Ecclesiastes 3:11 Ecclesiastes 6:7-12 Ecclesiastes 8:6-17 Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle Part 2 By Stephanie Miracle ​ Credits: Photo taken by Jimmy Miracle Curated by: Spark+Echo Arts, Artist in Residence 2016 2016 ​ ​ Dance Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ June 27, 2016 I am sharing a working in progress video that shows my process of playing and pondering with some of the material we have been experimenting with over the past two months. I am not sure things are going in the direction I was expecting. That is part of the fun of it, I suppose. Being surprised by what is revealed. I am also including a picture from this project. It is a documentation of a live performance. The man on the right hand side of the photo, a dear friend and supporter of my work, died unexpectedly just two weeks ago. This tragic event plunged me much deeper into Ecclesiastics. In my wild tumbling through questions of life and death I feel comforted by the text. (Photo taken by Jimmy Miracle) Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Stephanie Miracle is an American born independent choreographer and performer currently based in Essen, Germany with her husband visual artist Jimmy Miracle. She earned her MFA in Dance at the University of Maryland and a BA in Dance from Belhaven University. She is also a teacher of Klein Technique™ and holds prestigious honor of being a 2014/15 German Fulbright Fellow in the Performing Arts. In 2015 she joined as a full-time dancer with the Folkwang Tanzstudio/FTS. In addition to performing with the company she often works in collaboration with Henrietta Horn (DE), Carla Jordao (PT), Ana Farfan (MX), Paola Ponti, (IT) and Anna Shchkleina (RU). She is the director of Fakers Club, a site-specific performance experiment based on film and serial television. Stephanie's choreography has been described as “iconic and nuanced…with an irreverence that makes you smile unconsciously”(Rick Westerkamp, 2014). Often in vivid technicolor, Miracle’s works are crafted with a cinematic sensibility and follow subtle narrative threads. In addition to creating choreographies for traditional proscenium theaters her unique aesthetic finds special significance in common spaces for example, parking lots, bus stops, woman's prisons, hallways, staircases, and rooftops. in Germany, Hungary, Mexico, Russia, New York City, and Washington DC by various institutions including MetLife Foundation, Exchange Festival, Dance Place, Supernoval Festival, Open Look Festival, Performatica, Belhaven University, ES WIRD SOGAR SCHÖN, Barnes Crossing, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. Other awards include the Smith Scholarship Grant to attend ImPulsTanz in 2012, dance artist-in-residence at OMI International Residency 2012, DC Innovation grant in 2013, Bates Dance Festival Merit Scholarship 2013, Goldhaber Travel Scholarship 2014, and NextNOW new work grant 2014. Her collaborative piece “Drafting Plan” was awarded Best Duo at Barnes Crossing Festival 2015 in Cologne and at the 2016 SzoloDuo Festival in Budapest. She is honored to be a 2016 Artist in Residence at Spark and Echo Arts. Website Stephanie Miracle About the Artist Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle Part 1 Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle Part 3 Treasure Heart Artist in Residence 2016: Stephanie Miracle Stephanie Miracle Other Works By Follow the developmental journey of Stephanie's project by reading her first , third and final post as a 2016 Artist in Residence. All things are wearisome, more than one can say. The eye never has enough of seeing, nor the ear its fill of hearing. What has been will be again, what has been done will be done again; there is nothing new under the sun. (Ecclesiastes 1:8-9) He has made everything beautiful in its time. (Ecclesiastes 3:11) Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • Take to Heart

    Loading Video . . . Is this the world's first pop song from the book of Deuteronomy? We aren't sure. Either way, we hope this starts a trend of hit music from this substantial book. It's a good way to let the words sink in to your heart, and that's what Moses is talking about, yes? Deuteronomy 32:45-47 Take to Heart By The Spark & Echo Band ​ Credits: Written by Jonathon Roberts Performed by Jonathon Roberts (piano, vocals), Emily Clare Zempel (ukulele, vocals, bells), Mason Neely (drums), Jay Foote (bass) Mixed by Alex Foote Mastered by Matt Shane (Masterdisk) Artist Location: New York City Curated by: Spark+Echo Arts 2010 ​ ​ ​ Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ Is this the world's first pop song from the book of Deuteronomy? We aren't sure. Either way, we hope this starts a trend of hit music from this substantial book. It's a good way to let the words sink in to your heart, and that's what Moses is talking about, yes? Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ The Spark & Echo Band is a family outfit of songwriting-storytellers led by husband and wife duo Jonathon Roberts and Emily Clare Zempel. Their music brings forgotten poetry and wild stories from the Bible to life: visions of sparkling wheels in the sky, hunger and thirst, and legends of love as strong as death weave with memorable melodies and captivating rhythms. Drawing from a classical background, influenced by the pianism of Rufus Wainwright and Ben Folds, and emulating Paul Simon’s narratival techniques, Spark & Echo sings epic tales of love and adventure. The duo has collaborated on three full lengths albums (Spark&Echo, Inheritance, Cities Project), one video album (In the Clocktower), in addition to many theatrical collaborations, this very nonprofit, and two children. They live in beautiful Beacon, New York, with all of the above. Website The Spark & Echo Band About the Artist White Robe What a Day Deep Calls to Deep Yo Sé Do You Love Me? Where Can I Go? How to Be Free Flesh Lifeblood Artist in Residence 2015: Spark & Echo Band The Wheels Frogs Ruined Inheritance The Spark & Echo Band Other Works By Take to Heart Chorus: Take to Heart All these words I have solemnly declared Take to Heart All these words I have given you today Verse: So that you may command your children To obey all the words of the Law. (Chorus) They are not just idle words for you They are your life By them you will live long In the land, you’re crossing the river to hold They’re not just idle words They are your life (Chorus) Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • Caves and Echoes

    Loading Video . . . Marc Morin offers this impassioned reflection on the struggle to do the right thing in the face of ongoing adversity in response to 1 Samuel 24:3-7. 1 Samuel 24:3-7 Caves and Echoes By Marc Morin ​ Credits: Recording by Marc Morin Curated by: Michael Markham 2020 ​ ​ Spoken Word Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ This poetic reflection of a time in King David's life touches the area of our lives where our cave-like experiences in life have the power to direct our journey to the promise God has given us by the way we handle our storms. Too many times in life people see our accomplishments but rarely witness our struggles or pain experienced during our journey to arrive at that place of desired completion. With this said, our character invites us to look deeper in our caves and storms where they hear an echo of experiences turning into wisdom, lessons and beautiful characteristics of our hearts. Our destiny must be processed through these trying times so God can release the promise to the character we must become… who He promised it to. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Marc Morin is a father of three who abides in Brooklyn, New York with his wife Vimana. He serves as a deacon at Mission Network International For Human Services. He first felt the calling of a poet in the spring of 2015 where he wrote his first poem. Since finding this new desire for poetry he has written well over a thousand poems expressing his love for God, inner reflection and encouraging believers to have a closer relationship with Jesus Christ. Website Marc Morin About the Artist Marc Morin Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art Trapped in the caves of my promise, In the caves of misery and darkness With brethren yet no water View Full Written Work Title: Caves And Echoes by Marc Morin Trapped in the caves of my promise, In the caves of misery and darknessWith brethren yet no water (Simple days where I took walks about in confidence) Is this the reflection of the promise process? Helper of Joseph, remember me, my soul is in Egypt... I hang low with the fanged winged fiends And I hear their worries of hunger: "Let me see!" But I am like them except with holes in my flight Just when I soar, my enemy pierces me with words "He has fallen;" Arrows of lofty thoughts and discouragement of weighty nights Progression has one Master but I am it's servant... (My head is bowed and my eyes arise to the sounds of the morning My gaze quickly finds the horizon through the murky floor reflection The flooding of light approaches, coming to my countenance But the mouth of the cave has become darken- Wait! Clarity has sought my soul Here it comes in the hands of my own) And here, here comes my adversary... Upon my tools I stare, upon the choices I can grasp: With anger I can slay, but would this bring character delay? But with love, I know I can create- An example for others to follow. And just then I remembered when I led my sheep to peaceful waters (How I remember those days...) When my songs were simple, Words dancing with praise unto my starry Teacher And now look! My pen is dried in the staleness of my position And my ink is filled with pain and questions My canvas continually cries "too what end will you finish writing inward destruction?" I am being watered by His promise and the weight of memories Yes! How I loved Samuel... The one who blanketed my prayers while my head lay on rocks with our Rock My eyes strain with the grandeur of my possessions lost He has exposed himself and my sword cries vengeance: "Let me take back my light with his life in my knife!" But... But love calls me to raid his robe [The sound of clothing shredding] I WILL NOT LEAVE MY PROCESS! So let the caves whisper to many and their inner storms: "He echoed love" Close Loading Video . . . Trapped in the caves of my promise, In the caves of misery and darkness With brethren yet no water Download Full Written Work

  • Webs

    Loading Video . . . Brooklyn-based stop-motion animator and mixed media artist (painter, sculptor) Jessie Brugger chose Isaiah 59 for this fanciful and macabre exploration of Spark+Echo Arts' 2012 theme "Hands." Molding clay, Jessie inquires of the imagery in the passage, vividly animating the poetry of the ancient prophet's grim language. Isaiah 59 Webs By Jessie Brugger ​ Credits: ​ Curated by: Charis J Carmichael Braun 2012 ​ ​ Film, Stop Motion Animation Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ Born into a Catholic family and having a father who was a Catholic priest, I am intrigued with religion and how it takes such a presence in society. There are a lot of unknown's when it comes to Religion; for me, and my work is an exploration into that unknown. The church has been a main influence on my life and work; as it is the first place I understood hierarchy, power struggles and gender injustice, at the same time experiencing beauty, light, and spirituality. I often use the "Carnivalesque" as a vehicle to portray my thoughts and stories. I was interested in the Bible project that Spark and Echo Arts is doing because there were no limits placed on my interpretation of any passage from the Bible. I chose hands as my theme because I believe the Bible is a mixture of Man's hands and spirituality. I chose Isaiah 59 because it was so visually dark and showed how evil man could be, yet somewhere in hands that can do evil, they can also do beauty and goodness too. Hands have always been my favorite thing to draw since I was a child. My hands are my tools. Creating my vision through clay maquettes that I build in order to tell a story, I use the maquettes as a world to draw from, and then animate. The sculptures are raw and imperfect. I am interested in video because of the time element, I am interested in stop-animation because of the freedom of imagination it allows for: each photo that is taken in the process of a stop animation video is a moment in time that is captured, and complete, yet it is part of a bigger picture. My maquettes, paintings, drawings and videos are all part of a bigger world, in which I am creating. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Jessie Brugger was born in Puyallup, Washington. She started her artistic studies of painting, drawing, and mixed media at Western Washington University in 1997. In 2000, she transferred to Concordia University, in Montreal Quebec, receiving her Bachelors of Fine arts in 2002. Jessie moved to Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn in 2005, and in 2010 she completed a Masters of Fine Arts at the New York Academy of Art. She started doing stop animation in 2010 with her drawings, clay, and other mixed materials. The videos that Jessie makes are colorful and whimsical, yet disquieting and socially political. In April 2011, she was awarded “Best in Animation” at the New York International Film Festival for her video, “The Stained Glass Window.” Jessie works on her animations, maquettes, paintings and drawings in Brooklyn, New York. Website Jessie Brugger About the Artist Jessie Brugger Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • The Modern Day Queen of Sheba & Queen Esther

    Christopher-Williams_Queen-of-SheebaQueen-Esther-resized.jpg Loading Video . . . Visual artist, Christopher Adam Williams (AKA "The Black DaVinci") celebrates the enduring beauty of women of character in this meditation on Proverbs 11:16. Proverbs 11:16 The Modern Day Queen of Sheba & Queen Esther By Christopher Williams ​ Credits: ​ Curated by: Rebecca Testrake 2020 84 x 49.5 inches Oil on canvas and copper leaf ​ Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ "The Modern Day Queen of Sheba & Queen Esther" seeks to contribute to my emergent dialogue and expression of black joy. This body of work is dedicated to the joyous, resilient black women in my life. The use of the color purple invites a conversation about the color of our skin. Often our skin is associated with oil, darkness or dinginess. Darker skin, throughout history, has been considered ugly. However, the choice of the color purple is rooted not only in its beauty and luster, but also its royal ancestry. Colonial kings and queens decreed only royalty and the sophisticated were allowed to wear purple. Purple dye was considered more valuable than gold. My work depicts that African Americans wear their royal ancestry on their skin everyday. I then look back to early modern art history from the Byzantine art period, the gold, copper and silver leaf used in the background highlights my subjects as being blessed by God or as an object of veneration. The relationship of purple and gold allows for each portrait to project a majestic, heavenly glow. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Christopher Williams’ art practice focuses on Black Joy — a spiritual feeling that has uplifted the African Diaspora through countless trials and tribulations in the quest for freedom and equality. It defies a simplistic explanation. He explains its experience: Black Joy is like a heartbeat. Never bitter, it is sweeter than the blackest of cherries or the richest of chocolates. It’s like a steady climb or an out-of-frame kiss. It is a moment that is magical and void of being Black, judged and discriminated against. My joy, my Black Joy may not be the same as the next. It is my vehicle for connection, educating others and sharing my experience as a Black man. What makes the journey of my work unique is my ability to develop authentic empathy for my subject matter. I have found this process is like walking to the edge of darkness and then summoning the courage to take one more step to understand what lies beyond our differences. These steps are necessary to overcome bigotry, hatred and indifference, to embrace the pursuit of joy. Website Christopher Williams About the Artist Honor Thy Father Christopher Williams Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • Tree of Life

    freyberg_treeoflife_fullsize.jpg Loading Video . . . Reflecting on Proverbs 3:18, photographer Frances Freyberg captures a stunning image. Proverbs 3:18 Tree of Life By Frances Freyberg ​ Credits: ​ Curated by: Spark & Echo Arts, Self-Submitted 2016 ​ ​ Photography Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ She [wisdom] is a tree of life to them that lay hold upon her: and happy is every one that retaineth her. Proverbs 3:18 While this image appears to capture multiple, intertwined trees, it is actually a single banyan tree in Lahaina, Maui. The tree was planted in 1873 to honor the 50th anniversary of the area's first Protestant mission. Banyan trees grow from a central trunk, and as their branches spread outwards, they extend aerial roots that reach down to the ground and eventually form additional trunks to support further growth. This banyan tree, which was only eight feet tall at planting, now stands more than 60 feet tall, has 16 major trunks in addition to the original trunk, and stretches over a 200-foot area. Similarly, true wisdom grows from a strong and central focus on God. Properly nourished, it can spread like this banyan tree, taking root in all areas of our lives, and blessing those who shelter beneath its canopy. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ About Francis Freyburg: "Photographs have a unique ability to inspire reflection, hope and action. They hold the power to spark memories and encourage new adventures. They enable viewers to see familiar surroundings from a fresh perspective, or to explore uncharted territories for the very first time. Through my photography, I hope to educate people about our world, and to interest them in the natural beauty that surrounds us. I was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, where I grew to love the great outdoors. Childhood trips to exotic locations fostered an early appreciation for different places and cultures, as well as a continuing passion for travel. In 2008, I left my job in high-tech communications to travel the world for a year, taking photographs and writing about my experiences. During that time, I built an educational travel weblog ( www.wheresfrances.blogspot.com ) with weekly photos, as well as historical and cultural information about the countries I visited. I specialize in portraits of people, wildlife, nature and architecture from my travels to more than 60 countries. I’m particularly drawn to scenes that express the beauty, excitement, humor and diversity of our world, whether through a brilliantly colored blossom or a poignant face in the crowd." Website Frances Freyberg About the Artist Labyrinth For this child I prayed Frances Freyberg Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • A Call to Solitude

    Loading Video . . . "A Call to Solitude" is five movements of prose set to music. After writing the prose, I collaborated with John Forsleff to compose musical aspects of the piece, with the idea that the violin and guitar would provide the emotional content of the text. Hosea 2:6-23 A Call to Solitude By Ariele Macadangdang ​ Credits: Composed by Ariele Macadangdang and John Forsleff Performed by Sarah Amos, narrator; Ariele Macadangdang, violin; John Forsleff, guitar Artist Location: Southwestern Michigan Curated by: Benje and Ashley Daneman 2014 ​ ​ ​ Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ "A Call to Solitude" is five movements of prose set to music. After writing the prose, I collaborated with John Forsleff to compose musical aspects of the piece, with the idea that the violin and guitar would provide the emotional content of the text. The first movement is about a woman's invitation to a feast and the discovery of a new place. In the second and third movements she struggles to accept that the feast is set for her, and that it is given to her freely. In the fourth movement she shows up weary from a trying season of life, bringing a set of expectations to the rich man. She is a person who cannot put down her pride to accept love from the true source. The fifth movement is my attempt at depicting the unwavering invitation of the rich man and the release of freedom that comes from receiving love. The feast is symbolic of intimacy with the Lord. In a way the woman is Israel, but to me she represents followers of Jesus in different seasons, relating to the King. Every day Jesus invites us to a feast and most days we can't see the feast for what it is. At times when we can see it we shy away from it, thinking it is not ours to have. As a result we often settle for what we think we can provide for ourselves. Performers on this recording are Ariele Macadangdang, violin, John Forsleff, guitar, and Sarah Amos, narrator. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Ariele Macadangdang is a violinist from Southwest Michigan. In June 2012 she was a featured soloist in the Wal-Mart Annual Shareholders Meeting held in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Through her activities at Western Michigan University she has performed in collaborative concerts with jazz pianist Ed Simon, and Israeli jazz pianist/composer Alon Yavnai. She has twice performed at the Orfeo Music Festival held in the Italian Alps, where her current teacher, Renata Knific, is a faculty member. Since 2010 she has been a founding member and planter of a fine arts community outreach, Imago Dei, with InterVarsity Christian Ministry on her campus. Ariele is a freelance violinist for independent studio and recording projects with singer-songwriters in her area. She also enjoys improvisation and collaboration across artistic disciplines. She completed her undergraduate studies at Western Michigan University and is to begin her graduate studies at the University of Miami, Florida, in August 2014. Website Ariele Macadangdang About the Artist Ariele Macadangdang Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

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