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  • Daily Bread

    joshua-sterlin-jackson_daily-bread.jpg Loading Video . . . Artist Joshua Sterlin Jackson constructed this work to draw out a sense of what is felt when meditating as described in Psalm 1:2. Psalms 1:2 Daily Bread By Joshua Jackson ​ Credits: ​ Curated by: Marlanda Dekine 2017 11 x 14 inches ​ Acrylic on Canvas Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ In this piece I used cool tones and free-flowing colors that move in abstract directions to produce a feel of peace and meditation. Praying hands over the Bible symbolize one's meditation on Scripture. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Joshua Sterlin Jackson is a visual artist of Spartanburg, South Carolina. Josh creates art with the intentions to move people emotionally and mentally all the while creating the ‘wow factor’. When Josh creates his works he uses high contrast, subjects, and boldness of color to appeal to viewers. Josh states that art is a fun challenge more than it is an expressive outlet. His style of work expresses his personality and creative mindset naturally. He works in mediums ranging from pencil sketches to life size mural paintings. Currently Josh works as a freelance artist and participates in various shows and galleries. His goal is to bring growth to the arts to his city! Website Joshua Jackson About the Artist Joshua Jackson Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • Fig Tree

    jonathanroberts_figbranches.jpg Loading Video . . . We are excited to present "Fig Tree" by Cameron DeWhitt in response to Mark 11:12-14, with accompanying art work by Jon Roberts inspired by the song and John 15:5. Mark 11:12-14 Fig Tree By Cameron DeWhitt ​ Credits: Music and Lyrics by Cameron DeWhitt Visual Art by Jon Roberts Artist Location: Portland, Oregon Curated by: Jonathon Roberts 2011 ​ ​ ​ Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ From Cameron DeWhitt: “Fig Tree” is about being unable to reconcile things in the Bible with the character of God. Normally, I use Jesus as my primary reference to discern the nature of God, but Mark 11:12-14 is an example of a passage where Jesus said something I didn’t know what to do with, and still don’t. From Jon Roberts*: God does some offensive things sometimes. Take these delicious figs, for example. The only way they can be pollinated is by a wasp, who squeezes inside through the hole in the top – breaking off her wings in the process – lays eggs in some of the flowers (which are inside the fig), pollinates the rest of them, and then dies. Her body is consumed by the fig, and the fig is consumed by us, after the new generation of wasps has hatched and escaped the fig to continue the cycle. How interesting! How bizarre! Something that upon first sight strikes most of us as disgusting, creepy, and definitely a sign that that fruit is not fit for consumption, is actually the way God has chosen to provide for these two organisms, and in turn, to provide for us. It’s another witness to the fact that God works in us in ways we would not predict, and in ways which may strike us as painful or offensive at first. But if we remain in his love we can have faith that, unexpected as it may be, God will be faithful to bear good fruit in and through us. *Artist Jon Roberts is not related to Spark+Echo Arts co-founder Jonathon Roberts Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Cameron DeWhitt is an American clawhammer banjoist and songwriter born in Portland, Oregon. His live show is interactive, with sing-along sections, open discussions about song themes, and storytelling. He new self-titled record is available now on Bandcamp. Cameron’s songs explore themes of love, death, marriage, judgment and forgiveness. His lyrics display a quick, profound wit, enriched throughout with weighty metaphors and literary cross-references. Through personal and biblical stories, he prompts the listener to contemplate the definition of love, the character of God, and the human struggle towards hope and redemption. Cameron has developed a unique, melody-driven banjo style. While fluidly shifting modes and meters, he quotes popular melodies, improvises with other musicians, and makes musical jokes. His songs feature trumpet, string bass, drum set, complex vocal counterpoint and improvised solos. Cameron lives with his wife, Rebecca, in the East Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia, where he is a part of the Circle of Hope Community. He plays an Ome Jubilee banjo with a Moon bridge and a John Balch goat skin head. Website Cameron DeWhitt About the Artist Leavener Cameron DeWhitt Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • I Make Tents

    Loading Video . . . "I Make Tents" by Jonathon Roberts is poetic prose with a rhythmic soundscape exploring Apostle Paul's life as a tentmaker and his writings on wisdom and foolishness. 2 Corinthians 2:17 I Make Tents By Jonathon Roberts ​ Credits: ​ Curated by: ​ 2005 ​ ​ ​ Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ Saying Paul was a unique and dynamic person is an understatement. During his ministry he worked as a self-supporting tentmaker, so no one would accuse him of “peddling God’s Word for profit.” He communicated with people he served in many different ways depending on what they needed to hear, sometimes even using humor, sarcasm or a biting wit to get his point across. In this collage, sound samples from professors and politicians intertwine with lighter sounds and Paul’s playful and even biting words. This piece is also part of the larger multi-media theatrical production Project Paul . Like other parts of the production, this piece deals with some of Paul’s favorite themes: wisdom vs. foolishness, weakness and humility, and the painful “groaning” of this world. Paul the Tentmaker: 2 Corinthians 2:17, Acts 18:3, 1 Corinthians 9:1-18 The World is Groaning: Romans 8:20-23, 2 Corinthians 5:1-4 Wisdom and Foolishness: Isaiah 29:14, 1 Corinthians 1:18-31, 1 Corinthians 15:8 Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ J onathon Roberts is a composer and sound designer for games, film, theatre, and ensembles. His style grew out of classical and jazz training, and evolved through quality life adventures: touring the country in an RV with a one person theater piece on the Apostle Paul, living in Brooklyn with an improv music ensemble, performing in a downtown NYC absurdist comedy band, and a long stint writing music for the renowned slot machine company, High 5 Games. He has released four albums including the latest, Cities a song cycle personifying biblical cities. He created the popular podcast/web series ComposerDad Vs. Bible , in which ComposerDad accepts intense compositional challenges from a mysterious Bible while out with his kids. He frequently collaborates on music and theater projects with his wife, actor Emily Clare Zempel. They live in Beacon, NY, with their two boys and a tangled box of electrical cords. www.jonathonroberts.com Website Jonathon Roberts About the Artist The Sower Response There Is Room These are My Sons Consider Me a Partner Weakness The Day Is Almost Here Surrogate Babbler Remember Me Prayer How Beautiful I Am a Fool The Constant Ecclesiastes Cows Blessing Fools for Christ More Than Rubies Only a Few Years Will Pass Dear Friend Jonathon Roberts Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • Untitled (Colvin)

    R E Colvin Untitled 24X20 2013 Loading Video . . . Artist R. E. Colvin created a work exploring "Light and Darkness" through Ecclesiastes 7:23. The painting I have made, although similar to my current work, tries to get at this existential grasping more literally. Three shapes, essentially, "work" and "don't work." Ecclesiastes 7:23 Untitled (Colvin) By R. E. Colvin ​ Credits: ​ Curated by: Ebitenyefa Baralaye 2013 20 x 24 in ​ Acrylic and Oil on Canvas Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ I have always tried my best to let wisdom guide my thoughts and actions. I said to myself, “I am determined to be wise.” But it didn’t really work. (Ecclesiastes 7:23 NLT) Ecclesiastes has always been my favorite book in the Bible. I was in art school when I first read it, and maybe it is what lead me to study philosophy later. In rereading it, this verse struck me as profoundly funny; because it’s true. The painting I have made, although similar to my current work, tries to get at this existential grasping more literally. Three shapes, essentially, “work” and “don’t work.” The figural white center – seemingly bright – is part of a single shape that inhabits the top and bottom of the composition too. The dark shapes on either side then vacillate between presences (as parallel vertical planes extending out into space) and absences (as windows into an etherial blackness). This effect then shifts the center element forward and backward. Everything is unstable. In photographing my abstract work, I choose to include the wall surrounding the piece rather than cropping down to the image. This preserves the physicality of the work – it is a painted object – which is important to its experience. The painting has an existential presence like us. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ R. E. Colvin is an artist and arts writer based in New York City. Website R. E. Colvin About the Artist R. E. Colvin Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • the road ends.

    Loading Video . . . Playwright Chandler Crawford brings us a fascinating script, written through inspiration found in Proverbs 25:21-22. The excerpt (Proverbs 25: 21-22), in summation, speaks about the virtue of human kindness; even to your enemy. Proverbs 25:21-22 the road ends. By Chandler Crawford ​ Credits: ​ Curated by: Lauren Ferebee 2016 ​ ​ One-Act Play Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ As I was sifting through the seemingly endless Book of Proverbs, I stumbled upon a passage that really struck a chord. The excerpt (Proverbs 25: 21-22), in summation, speaks about the virtue of human kindness; even to your enemy. Solomon wrote these proverbs as a means to exemplify wisdom and raise questions of ethics, morality, right from wrong and even the meaning of human life. As an artist and a playwright, I am constantly asking myself what does it mean to be right or wrong, as well as always challenging the ideas of human existence. Why are we here? Where are we going? Where have we been? And most importantly, how do the people around us influence the paths we take? I attempt to ask all of these questions in the road ends., but not necessarily answer them. I believe, as a human race, we all take similar paths in life. I also believe our morality is one of the greatest powers in guiding us on our path. We all have friends, and we all have enemies, and how we treat the ones who mistreat us, speaks loudest to our own morality. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Chandler Crawford Born and raised in the South, Chandler has been making theatre happen since his early teens. A recent graduate of USC Upstate, Chandler has been working as a theatre artist in the sleepy town of Spartanburg, SC where he helps bring theatre diversity to his community through writing, acting and producing. He is a co-founder of AiR Bud Improv and a member of a playwriting collective, Playhaus, which aims to produce new works from young and emerging playwrights. Chandler also collaborates as a writer and producer with HUB-BUB, a non-profit arts outreach organization in Spartanburg. the road ends . is Chandler’s first published play, and he is thrilled to working with Spark and Echo. Website Chandler Crawford About the Artist Chandler Crawford Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art A fork in a dirt road in the middle of an arid desert. An old man sits on the ground in the center of the fork. View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . A fork in a dirt road in the middle of an arid desert. An old man sits on the ground in the center of the fork. Download Full Written Work

  • Hannah

    img_5057-pointy-elbow.jpg Loading Video . . . The starkness of this wonderful piece by Claire Bateman captures the sense of Hannah's emptiness and pain which she presents before God as portrayed in 1 Samuel 1:10. 1 Samuel 1:10 Hannah By Claire Bateman ​ Credits: ​ Curated by: Spark+Echo Arts 2018 ​ ​ ​ Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ Hannah is portrayed as an elongated figure with empty arms, her entire folded around her internal space, her grief, which she transforms into prayer. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Claire Bateman is the author of eight poetry collections, most recently, Scape with New Issues Poetry & Prose (Kalamazoo). Her other collections are The Bicycle Slow Race (Wesleyan University Press, 1991), Friction (Eighth Mountain Poetry Prize, 1998), At the Funeral of the Ether (Ninety-Six Press, 1998), Clumsy (New Issues Poetry & Prose, 2003), Leap (New Issues, 2005), Coronology (Etruscan Press, 2010), and Locals (Serving House Books, 2012). She has been awarded Individual Artist Fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Tennessee Arts Commission, and the Surdna Foundation, as well as the New Millennium Writing Award and two Pushcart Prizes, and has taught at Clemson University and various workshops and conferences. She lives in Greenville, SC, teaches at the Fine Arts Center, and is an advisory editor for Orison Press. More of her work can be found at clairebatemanwork.blogspot.com Website Claire Bateman About the Artist Veridical Claire Bateman Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • I’ve Got All the Light I Need

    Loading Video . . . Composer and vocalist Ashley Gonzalez Daneman created a beautiful song inspired by Job 17:12-13. Job 17:12-13 I’ve Got All the Light I Need By Ashley Daneman ​ Credits: Words & Music by Ashley Daneman Vox, mouth/hand percussion, piano, mandolin, and shaker Performed and recorded by Ashley Daneman Mixed and mastered by Gordon van Gent Curated by: Emily Clare Zempel 2013 ​ ​ ​ Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ Life is full of competing priorities. Most of my work deals with contradiction or the dual existence of contrasting realities. We could say that light represents goodness and darkness is evil, but it could be difficult to discern which is which. You and I may agree on a few evils, but aren’t the rest of them just shades of gray? What is true goodness? Humans, as a whole, can’t agree on this. For me, this passage in the Bible reflects on people’s differing perspectives about what truth is, and Job’s fear that he might accidentally believe a lie and eternally suffer for it. Given all the different belief systems about the afterlife, how then, does a person decide what’s true? The path of least resistance is to take a casual approach and release yourself from the responsibility of self-preservation in the afterlife. Assuming that either “nothing” or nothing “bad” will happen to you gives you peace of mind now, but it is a gamble. And whether your winnings or losses are large or small…we’ll have to wait to find out. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ A late career start and plenty of interesting life turns have caused Daneman to go deep with her blend of jazz and modern folk debuting “a publicly intimate recording that is frank and unapologetic. Beauty Indestructible is a collection of nine original "spirit poems" scored and written by Daneman, existing as an intensely personal song cycle. Daneman addresses the fundamental healing power of love” (C. Michael Bailey, All About Jazz). Drawing comparisons to Becca Stevens, Laura Nyro, and even Stephen Sondheim, Beauty Indestructible is summed up as “beautiful jazz art music from a gorgeous voice with superb accompaniment” (Mark S. Tucker, Folk & Acoustic Music Exchange) and as “a profound work of art that is so alive, so positive, and so blessedly musical” (Richard Kamins, Step Tempest). “Charming and enchanting with its offbeat/outside the lines sensibilities, [Beauty Indestructible] is killer stuff that’s sure to resonate with the gypsy in your soul” (Chris Spector, Midwest Record). Website Ashley Daneman About the Artist and the fertile field… Ashley Daneman Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • Romans 12:9-13

    David Chang Romans 129 132 Loading Video . . . We are excited to present a work by calligraphy-influenced artist, David Chang, responding to Romans 12:9-13. Romans 12:9-13 Romans 12:9-13 By David Chang ​ Credits: ​ Curated by: Ebitenyefa Baralaye 2012 17 x 22 inches ​ Ruling pen, Ink and Gouache Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ Based on the topic of friend and community, I found that Romans 12:9-13 really spoke to me; verse 13 in particular. For the creation of the piece, I took impressions from a community center where I was having a show. This served as my foundation. The calligraphy is derived from the textures that appear from the impression. I gradually build up the layers, weaving letter forms and paying attention to composition. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ The art of David Chang is a sustained exploration into the significance and meaning of words and texts as embodied through physical gestures. Centuries-old eastern techniques in calligraphy find new form in the western alphabet as the artist shapes his own hermeneutics of the hand. The artist’s brushwork, vacillating between traditional scripts and contemporary abstraction, issues statements of personal, cultural, and spiritual awareness, while it also retains an autonomous formal beauty full of urgency and grace. Website David Chang About the Artist David Chang Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • In the Wake of the Storm

    Loading Video . . . Emily Rose Hazel's work responds to the devastation after Hurricane Sandy, the theme of "Light and Darkness" as she builds a poetry collection responding to every theme from the year as a 2013 Isaiah 59:9-11 In the Wake of the Storm By Emily Ruth Hazel ​ Credits: ​ Curated by: Spark+Echo Arts, Artist in Resident 2013 2013 ​ ​ Poetry/Spoken Word Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ “In the Wake of the Storm” is a response to the devastation of Hurricane Sandy, particularly its impact on the New York metro region. While I was very grateful to have come through the storm unscathed, a number of my friends were directly affected by it. Some felt the effects for days; others are still dealing with the aftermath months later. After seeing widespread power outages and damage from fallen trees, flooding, and fires, those images stayed with me. Talking with people who had experienced these losses, I was struck by how quickly our modern world can be turned upside-down and how powerless we feel when this happens. Crisis, as we know, brings out the best and the worst in human nature—the light and the dark. It presents an opportunity for people to adapt with remarkable resilience and generously help each other, or to dip into despair and take advantage of one another’s vulnerability. I wanted to write a poem that would hold kernels of many stories from people in different areas who are recovering from disaster, and to leave room for questions that arise out of pain and anger, as a way of giving voice to their ongoing struggle. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Emily Ruth Hazel is a poet, writer, and cross-pollinator who is passionate about diversifying the audience for poetry and giving voice to people who have been marginalized. Selected as the Honorary Poet for the 25th Annual Langston Hughes Community Poetry Reading in Providence, Rhode Island, she presented a commissioned tribute to the Poet Laureate of Harlem in February of 2020. She is a two-time recipient of national Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Prizes and was awarded a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship for a residency at The Hambidge Center in 2014. Her chapbook, Body & Soul (Finishing Line Press, 2005) , was a New Women’s Voices finalist. Emily’s work has appeared in numerous anthologies, magazines, literary journals, and digital projects, including Kinfolks: A Journal of Black Expression and Magnolia: A Journal of Women’s Socially Engaged Literature. Her poetry has also been featured on music albums, in a hair salon art installation, and in a science museum exhibition. Emily has written more than twenty commissioned works for organizations, arts productions, social justice projects, and private clients. Currently, she is developing several poetry book manuscripts and writing lyrics for an original musical inspired by the life of the extraordinary singer and Civil Rights icon Marian Anderson. A graduate of Oberlin College’s Creative Writing Program and a former New Yorker, she is now based in the Los Angeles area. EmilyRuthHazel.com Instagram: @EmilyRuthHazel Facebook.com/EmilyRuthHazel Website Emily Ruth Hazel About the Artist Word of Mouth Circling the Waist of Wisdom Give Me a Name Homecoming Runaway Give Us This Day Undressing Prayer Emily Ruth Hazel Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art Shattered windows that we are, strangers look through us at the aftermath. We are the dislocated, out of socket. View Full Written Work In the Wake of the Storm by Emily Rose Hazel Shattered windows that we are, strangers look through us at the aftermath. We are the dislocated, out of socket. Bullied by the wind, knocked down, roots exposed. We are the stories that go on breathing after the headlines have exhausted themselves, the survivors at the end of each obituary. We are the families evicted by the ocean: the deep has dragged its bloated belly over the seawall, over the roads, and made itself at home in our living rooms. Our kitchen floors are covered with its afterthoughts. Our basements have been emptied of meaning. Mountains of sand to be moved. Of what use is faith to us, if it’s not muscled and doesn’t carry its own shovel? What good is prayer unless it can clear away all the debris and show us what we’re standing on? We are like broken boats abandoned in the streets. We are the houses we’ve been anxious to return to, desperate to reclaim ourselves. >p>The landscape as we knew it has dissolved. A slab of what was once the boardwalk— so many summers—washed up in a driveway. Still bolted to the wood, a bench on which we might have eaten ice cream. Rows of fire-ravaged houses: twisted metal bedframes, front steps leading nowhere. A green door, left ajar, listing on its hinges. Behind it, the tangled remains—no walls, just a swamp of blackened bricks. >Everything is muddy and tastes of salt and ashes. We wash dishes, clothes, our shivering bodies with gratitude for clean but frigid water, trying to contain the bitterness, stop the infection from spreading. Our batteries are dying, our bright white circles of certainty fading to hazy, amber halos. In electricity we trust, but now we’re going back to what has guided generations. Every match strikes a word of courage against the dark: a tongue of flame flares up and licks the wick. In this blind tunnel of days, we huddle together, relearn old ways to connect, trying to forget how powerless we are. And for a while, darkness slithers away, hides in the corners of our minds. A caravan of strangers parked along the shoulder of the road, we wait for hours to fill our empty tanks. At the church, we stand in yet another line to be handed rationed supplies: a bucket and a flimsy sponge mop, two rolls of toilet paper, a Ziploc sandwich bag of laundry powder. We reach into a box of matchbooks, but there are no more candles to be found. The days, mere stubs of wax, burn out quickly now. Night comes early to claim us. Not even a stoplight punctuates the run-on sentence of the dark as far as we can see. After half-living so long without, will it seem a strange miracle when the wires hum with energy again? Will we dizzy ourselves in celebration, or simply weep with relief? The promise of restoration stale on winter’s breath, we are weary of waiting for the sun to remember us. We live on the far end of enough. Justice does not reach us here. We open our doors and step into bottomless shadows. We have lost our eyes. We feel our way along the walls as if the answers were written in braille. As if our fingers could read. Among the strong, we are like the dead. Our hunger is an angry growl. Our mourning is a hollow, feathered cry. We stretch out our hands for deliverance and it floats away, just beyond our reach. We cling to each other to keep the ones we love from being swept away by waves of despair. God, if you hear us, why are you silent? Is it because you are listening? Or is your own throat filled with sand? Push the waters back to where they belong. If it’s true you can dry up the sea with a word, have you misplaced what you meant to say? If you are with us, how can we know, when you have pulled down the curtain and snuffed out all the lights in the sky so that we cannot even see your silhouette? Are you too tired to rescue us? Are your arms too short to save? We are still waiting for daybreak, for your mercy to shine on the rest of us sitting in the dark, sleeping in the shadow of death— for you to show us, one foot at a time, how to navigate these ruins and somehow forge a crooked path to peace. What do we have left? Splinters of memories, jars of peanut butter to sustain us, the generosity of friends. The work to be done stretches before us like an ocean. For now, we share what little light we have. We swaddle babies in blankets. We climb the stairs in high-rise buildings to bring meals to aging parents. We cup one hand around this flicker of hope, our wavering belief that even now, help is on its way from somewhere. Close Loading Video . . . Shattered windows that we are, strangers look through us at the aftermath. We are the dislocated, out of socket. Download Full Written Work

  • Unto the Nor

    Loading Video . . . The fantastic musical duo Ben + Vesper created mesmerizing song in response to the theme of "Memory" from Ecclesiastes 1:5-­7. Ecclesiastes 1:5-7 Unto the Nor By Ben + Stamper ​ Credits: Performed by: Ben Stamper, voice, acoustic guitar Vox by Vesper Stamper Electric Guitar by Josh Stamper Synthesizer by Nick Shopa Bass by John Mosloskie Drums by Steve Oyola Curated by: Jonathon Roberts 2013 ​ ​ ​ Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ The text for this song is derived from Ecclesiastes 1:5-7. I initially chose this book because it has long been my father's favorite book of the Bible, and I read it to feel close to both my heavenly Father as well as my earthly one. I was drawn to this particular passage as it relates to the idea of memory through routine occurrence. Phenomenon such as the sun "rising" or the course of a river ceases to become phenomenon over time, yet these natural cycles are often the ones that lay entrenched in our subconscious and shape the way we respond to the world around us. Similarly, unique and mundane human patterns can form the strongest bonds to our past, and to our ultimate destiny. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Ben + Vesper are that musical married couple from NJ who are dually described as “lightly entwined earthbound angels” and “two Disneyfied hyenas yowling at each other.” Since joining up with the Sounds Familyre record label in 2005, Ben + Vesper have released four albums while performing and collaborating with the likes of Sufjan Stevens, Daniel Smith (Danielson), Kurt Weisman (Feathers) and Chris Weisman (Happy Birthday), John Mosloskie and Steve Oyola (Holler, Wild Rose!) and Nick Shopa (Papertwin). As a band, Ben + Vesper is a wide musical spectrum, and such versatility on stage and in the studio comes from their love of working with musicians from different genres and backgrounds, while Ben + Vesper’s vocals remain always at the helm. Website Ben + Stamper About the Artist Ben + Stamper Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • Berbert

    Loading Video . . . This quirky one-act play by playwright Adam Szymkowicz, performed in this audio recording by a talented group of actors, responds to the book of Titus as a whole. Titus 3:15 Titus 1:15-2:8 Titus 3:1-3:7 Titus 1:1-4 Berbert By Adam Szymkowicz ​ Credits: Playwright by Adam Szymkowicz CAST: T by Anna O’Donoghue CAST: Angie by Nandita Shenoy CAST: Paul by Robert Manning, Jr. CAST: Berbert by Michael Markham Curated by: Michael Markham 2018 ​ ​ One Act Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ In my play, I reset Titus in a corporate setting-- Instead of setting up churches in Crete, "T" is tasked with hiring a new staff at an unnamed office. To me, Titus is about figuring out how to build human organizations correctly and I thought that was apt as in offices all over the country people are aligning mission statements and figuring out best practices. But we are human, and we do not always succeed in the ways we want, as "T" shows us. And it's also possible to fail when you lead with love. But we try all the same to do good, don't we? Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ ADAM SZYMKOWICZ ’s plays have been produced throughout the U.S., and in Canada, England, Wales, The Isle of Man, Ireland, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Australia, Germany, Greece, Mexico, Turkey, Switzerland, South Korea, Thailand, Sweden, Austria, Slovenia and Lithuania. His work has been presented or developed at such places as Portland Center Stage, MCC Theater, Ars Nova, South Coast Rep, Playwrights Horizons, LCT3, LAByrinth Theater Company, The Lark, Rattlestick Playwrights Theater, Primary Stages and The New Group, among others. Published plays include Deflowering Waldo, Pretty Theft, Food For Fish, Hearts Like Fists, Incendiary, Clown Bar, The Why Overhead, Adventures of Super Margaret, 7 Ways To Say I Love You, Rare Birds, Marian Or The True Tale of Robin Hood, Kodachrome, Mercy, The Book Store, Old Fashioned Cold Fusion, The Parking Lot, The Night Children, Clown Bar 2, The Wooden Heart, Stockholm Syndrome, 100 Things I Never Said To You, 100 Love Letters I Never Sent and Nerve . His plays are published by Dramatists Play Service, Concord/Samuel French, Playscripts, Broadway Play Publishing, Theatrical Rights Worldwide, Stage Partners and Original Works Publishing, and are featured in numerous Smith and Kraus and Applause books. His monologue book, Small Explosions comes out from Applause in 2023. He was the premiere Resident Playwright at The Chance Theater in Anaheim, CA and the first playwright to participate in Bloomington Playwrights Projects' Square One Series. He has been to The Orchard Project and to JAW at Portland Center Stage, served twice as Playwright in Residence at the William Inge Center, and took part in The Dramatists Guild Fund's Traveling Masters program. Szymkowicz received a grant from the CT Commission on Culture & Tourism, and has been commissioned by South Coast Rep, Rising Phoenix Rep, Texas State University, The NOLA Project, Single Carrot Theater, and Flux Theater Ensemble. Adam received a Playwright's Diploma from The Juilliard School's Lila Acheson Wallace American Playwrights Program and an MFA from Columbia University where he was the Dean's Fellow. Szymkowicz is a two-time Lecomte du Nouy Prize winner, a member of the Dramatists Guild, Writer's Guild of America, and was a member of Primary Stages' Dorothy Strelsin New American Writer's Group, the MCC Playwright's Coalition and of the first Ars Nova Play Group. He has interviewed 1000 playwrights on his blog . Szymkowicz is the Literary Manager at The Juilliard School, supporting the playwriting program there. For more, go to www.adamszymkowicz.com . Website Adam Szymkowicz About the Artist Adam Szymkowicz Other Works By Read the script here: Berbert CAST MEMBERS IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE: Anna O’Donoghue is an actor, writer, and literary manager based in New York City. She has appeared on, off, and off-off-Broadway, and has worked regionally in Maine, Massachusetts, Minneapolis, Missouri, Kansas, New Jersey, New Mexico, Idaho, Pennsylvania, Vermont, and Washington, D.C. She is a graduate of The Juilliard School. Nandita Shenoy is an actor-writer living in New York. Previous Adam Szymkowicz plays that she has acted in are Marian, or The True Tale of Robin Hood produced by Flux Theatre Ensemble and Mercy at the New Jersey Repertory Theater. When not acting in plays by Adam, she writes plays and occasionally stars in them, like her Off-Broadway play, Washer/Dryer, produced by Ma-Yi Theater Company. Nandita holds a BA in English literature from Yale University. AEA/SAG-AFTRA www.nanditashenoy.com Robert Manning, Jr. is a graduate of the University of Washington’s MFA Professional Acting Training Program. Working on Broadway and Off; working in television and film; Rob is honored to lend his voice to this wonderful project. 2008 NAACP Theatre Award Nomination - Best Lead Actor. 2010 NAACP Best Supporting nomination. 2012 NAACP Best Ensemble win. He would like to thank his parents and his lovely family for their continued love and support. For more information on Robert, please visit robertmanningjr.com . Michael Markham — NY Credits: "The Spectacular Demise of Platonov"; "christopher marlowe’s chloroform dreams"; "Mother Courage and Her Children" and "Macbeth" at The Public. Film & TV: Law & Order; The Decades of Mason Carroll; Black Card (HBO); When Things Fall Apart; Home Office; Fumes; Lies. Owner - KiteMonkey Productions. Training: The Juilliard School. SAG-AFTRA, AEA: www.MichaelMarkhamOnline.com Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • folia ligni

    Loading Video . . . Composer Sidney Marquez Boquiren explores the theme of healing through passages from Ecclesiastes, John, and Revelation in his work folia ligni. Ecclesiastes 3:1-8 folia ligni By Sidney Marquez Boquiren ​ Credits: ​ Curated by: Jonathon Roberts 2014 ​ ​ ​ Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ folia ligni takes as its inspiration three sets of Biblical verses: Ecclesiastes 3:1-8; John 14:27; and Revelation 22:2. The work itself is a diptych that consists of meditations on the verses from Ecclesiastes and the Gospel of St. John, written for piano, with the title ("leaves of the tree") taken from Revelation 22:2 which is the verse that undergirds folia ligni : "The leaves of the tree were for the healing of the nations." It is this healing of nations and (by extension) of peoples that I tried to get at, not in the sense of a direct depiction of some process of healing but more as a sort of struggle to achieve this healing, a striving to reach "a time of peace." Et in terra pax. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Sidney Marquez Boquiren is a composer-performer who grew up in the Philippines and Saudi Arabia but has spent most of his life in the United States. He collaborates with artists on various projects that include opera ( Independence Eve with Daniel Neer); Biblical illumination ( folia ligni for Spark and Echo Arts); and multi-media ( The Gretel Project with Lauren K. Alleyne, Catherine Chung, and Tomiko Jones). As a pianist, he performs regularly with Rhymes With Opera and pulsoptional. A MacDowell Fellow, Sidney is currently the Chair of the Department of Music at Adelphi University in Garden City, New York, where he teaches music theory and composition. He is also a cantor and sings in the choir of The Church of St. Francis Xavier in Manhattan, New York. Website Sidney Marquez Boquiren About the Artist Sidney Marquez Boquiren Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

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