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  • I once was blind but now I see

    blindbutnowisee_melissavandermause.jpg Loading Video . . . We are pleased to feature a photo collage created by photographer Melissa Vandermause in response to a story about sight from John 9. The cross images as I have arranged them (from left to right) begin with subtle, vague visions to a powerful, obvious vision of the cross. John 9:17-25 I once was blind but now I see By Melissa Vandermause ​ Credits: ​ Curated by: ​ 2011 ​ ​ Digital photo collage Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ These images are part of a series of "abstract" crosses that I've found on a variety of different photo shoots, both personal and while on specific jobs. I was inspired by another photographer, Carla Ten Eyke, who looks for "10" while she is on location shooting. Because God is omnipresent, it's exciting to visualize the cross in multiple locations, such as a cobblestone road or a shadow made by a pergola. For this specific arrangement of crosses I came up a theme from the biblical story about Jesus healing the blind man at the Pool of Siloam in John 9:17-25. The cross images as I have arranged them (from left to right) begin with subtle, vague visions to a powerful, obvious vision of the cross. I like to correlate that to this story along with our personal sinful confusion in this world, and how God's Holy Spirit brings us to faith and shows us the clear vision of Jesus saving work through God's Word. Even as a life-long Christian, my vision of the cross can become fuzzy and unclear when I allow sin to overcome me and cloud my world vision. Then going back to God's Word and keeping a focus on him helps my world vision be a world vision of peace through Jesus. God may not be visible to us as he was in the Bible, however he is alive and present in our world daily. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Melissa Vandermause has a B. A. in Fine Art from Bethany Lutheran College in Mankato, MN, where she studied studio art and concentrated in photography and graphic design. After she graduated, she worked with New Generation Studio (now Lime Rock Photography) in Mankato, and was the recipient of the Wedding Album of the Year (2006 MPPA) award. Melissa, her husband Greg and two children live and work near Hartford, Connecticut where Melissa documents, creates and “captures life as intended” with her own professional photography studio, Galleria Vivid. Website Melissa Vandermause About the Artist "From Infancy..." Melissa Vandermause Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • IsraelearsI

    emmitt-israel-feat.jpg EmmittIsrael2.jpg Loading Video . . . Artist Emmitt Klein-Stropnicky responds to Joshua 1:1-6. Joshua 1:1-6 IsraelearsI By Emmitt Klein-Stropnicky ​ Credits: ​ Curated by: Evelyn C. Lewis 2015 3/8 x 20 x 25 inches Drawing- pen and ink on dentil. Frame- fabricated steel with satin wax finish Mixed Media Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ It takes much meditation and concentration to trace the intricacies of a map. What is most fascinating is what I see within them as they emerge on the page. Often I find an arrangement which renders the map in a fitting representation of itself. In this case it is almost animalistic and yet so beautiful and simple. By mirror imagining the map I have taken it to another level of beauty. Maps are so full of dialogue and history. I wanted to remove some of the loaded politics and religion that is behind Israel‚ strip it of its names and labels. The passage I chose represents so perfectly what is still going on in this land today. Often in my work I combine different mediums and art forms (I.e. drawing and sculpture), which is why I chose to suspend the drawing so one can walk around the piece and view it's transparency from both sides. I saw it fit to juxtapose the map in front of a Brooklyn cityscape. it plays on my personal Jewish background and having been to Israel versus my residence in Brooklyn. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Emmitt Klein-Stropnicky is a transgender artist who has resided in Brooklyn since he graduated from Pratt Institute in 2008 with a BFA in Sculpture. The spark for his love of maps all began when he traced his first map of his coastal hometown in Massachusetts. He currently works as lead fabricator at a high-end metal shop where he is continuing to pursue his passion for metalworking. Website Emmitt Klein-Stropnicky About the Artist Emmitt Klein-Stropnicky Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • Cycles: A Collaboration of Dance and Spoken Word Poetry

    Loading Video . . . Spark+Echo Arts Artistic Advisor Emily SoRelle Adams explored scripture through dance at our recent event, Reflections on Water: New Works of Music, Dance, and Spoken Word Poetry. Curated by Emily Adams and Emily Ruth Hazel, the event was held on Governors Island, the perfect place to explore the theme of "Water" as part of Metropolitan Water Alliance's City of Water Day. This work was a collaborative piece choreographed to the poem “Cycles” written and spoken by Emily Ruth Hazel. It was based on the verses of the Lord’s Prayer, specifically Matthew 6:10 (in italics): “Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name. Your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us today our daily bread. And forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one.” The piece also responds to Emily Ruth Hazel’s poem of the same name, which explores how the nature of water mirrors the natures of God as God is described in the above passage. Matthew 6:10​ Cycles: A Collaboration of Dance and Spoken Word Poetry By Emily Adams ​ Credits: Choreographed and Danced by Emily SoRelle Adams Poetry by Emily Ruth Hazel Sound Scape by Skip SoRelle Filmed by Michael Markham Curated by: Spark+Echo Arts 2012 ​ ​ Collaborative Live Performance, Dance and Spoken Word Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ Inspired by Emily Hazel's thoughtful poetry, I decided to step out of my comfort zone and take on the challenge of choreographing to the spoken word for the first time in my professional dance career. I ended up using the rhythm of Emily's words as my music and used the rich imagery in the poem inspired by scripture to create movement that has hopefully added another layer of insight to her work and to the scripture it's based on. As a final element I asked sound designer, Skip SoRelle, to create a simple sound backdrop of rain falling on a lake to be played during the dance. It was the cohesive last piece that helped bring it all together. I am very thankful for the artistic growth I experienced through working on this project, and for the opportunity to have been able to engage with scripture in such a tangible way. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Emily SoRelle Adams is a freelance dancer and teacher based in NYC. She studied dance at S.M.U.- Meadows School of the Arts in Dallas, TX before dancing professionally with Ballet Austin and the Washington Ballet. Since moving to the city Emily has had the opportunity to perform with companies including the Metropolitan Opera, New Chamber Ballet, Connecticut Ballet and Rebecca Kelly Ballet. She has also had the chance to share her love of dance to students of all ages and levels. Emily currently lives in Brooklyn with her husband Kenyon and continues to seek out new artistic endeavors here in the city and beyond. emilysorelleadams.tumblr.com Website Emily Adams About the Artist Emily Adams Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • Veridical

    veridical_claire-bateman.jpg Loading Video . . . The lush visuals of Claire Bateman's work hearken to the tangible abundance of God's mercy offered in Jude 1:2. Jude 1:2 Veridical By Claire Bateman ​ Credits: ​ Curated by: Jonathon Roberts 2017 ​ ​ Alcohol inks on three stacked layers of polyester film Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ May mercy, peace, and love be lavished on you. In my piece, "Veridical," I imagine this lavishing as a kind of botanical abundance, as expressed in Hildegard of Bingen's poetic statement, "The Word is living, being, spirit, all verdant greening, all creativity. This Word manifests itself in every creature." Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Claire Bateman is the author of eight poetry collections, most recently, Scape with New Issues Poetry & Prose (Kalamazoo). Her other collections are The Bicycle Slow Race (Wesleyan University Press, 1991), Friction (Eighth Mountain Poetry Prize, 1998), At the Funeral of the Ether (Ninety-Six Press, 1998), Clumsy (New Issues Poetry & Prose, 2003), Leap (New Issues, 2005), Coronology (Etruscan Press, 2010), and Locals (Serving House Books, 2012). She has been awarded Individual Artist Fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Tennessee Arts Commission, and the Surdna Foundation, as well as the New Millennium Writing Award and two Pushcart Prizes, and has taught at Clemson University and various workshops and conferences. She lives in Greenville, SC, teaches at the Fine Arts Center, and is an advisory editor for Orison Press. More of her work can be found at clairebatemanwork.blogspot.com Website Claire Bateman About the Artist Hannah Claire Bateman Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • Habakkuk's Hootenanny

    Loading Video . . . Brooklyn Composer Michael Hearst rounds up the local jam band for a hootenanny on injustice and the words of the prophet Habakkuk. Habakkuk 1:1-4 Habakkuk's Hootenanny By Michael Hearst ​ Credits: Composer, guitar, vocals by Michael Hearst Band: The Huffbunnies Artist photo by Franck Bohbot Artist Location: Brooklyn Curated by: ​ 2018 ​ ​ Cinematic Hootenanny Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ While trying to decide which direction to take this project, the minute I read the "Habakkuk's Complaint" verse, I knew! As it turns out, there's a "jam band" on my block in Park Slope, Brooklyn. For the past three years, every Wednesday night a handful of us get together (each week at a different house) and play old-timey music, drink wine, eat snacks, and vent about politics. The verse couldn't have been more fitting or timely. I recorded the band playing the song using two iPhones (to get stereo) and then brought the recording into my studio the next day, over-dubbing a few more instruments and vocal tracks. All along I knew I wanted to end-cap the piece with something more cinematic, turning it into an imaginary section from a movie or modern dance. And there you have it. P.S. I told the band I would use the proceeds to take us all out for dinner : ) Composed, Recorded, Mixed by Michael Hearst Performed by Michael Hearst and The Huffbunnies John Fabricant - vocals Stephen Gerard - banjo, vocals Robert Glasser - guitar, vocals Michael Hearst - guitar, vocals Steve Lewis - ukulele, vocals Nicki Pombier Berger - washboard, vocals Toby Snyder - mandolin, vocals Tom Swafford - fiddle Doyle Warren - vocals Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Michael Hearst is a composer, multi-instrumentalist, and writer, whose vast output is marked by a fascination with extremely specific themes, and with wanting to learn as much as he can about almost everything. His most recent project is a three-part book series, each book geared toward a different large theme: Unusual Creatures , Extraordinary People , and Curious Constructions . The first book, Unusual Creatures, includes the companion album, Songs For Unusual Creatures , and sections of the book have been made into a PBS Digital series. His previous album, Songs For Ice Cream Trucks has been used by at least 50 ice cream trucks around the world. Hearst has also composed soundtracks for the movies To Be Takei , Magic Camp , The House Of Suh , and The Good Mother among others. Michael Hearst is a founding member of the band One Ring Zero , who have released nine albums, including the literary collaboration As Smart As We Are (The Author Project), featuring lyrics by Paul Auster, Margaret Atwood, Dave Eggers, and Neil Gaiman, among others; Planets , a collection of new compositions to represent the solar system and beyond; and their most recent, The Recipe Project , in which the band has taken recipes from today’s top chefs (Mario Batali, Tom Colicchio, David Chang, etc.), set them to music, and sing them word for word. Hearst has performed and given lectures and workshops at universities, museums, and cultural centers around the world. He has toured with The Magnetic Fields, performed with The Kronos Quartet at Carnegie Hall, and has appeared on such shows as NPR's Fresh Air, A+E's Breakfast With The Arts, and NBC's The Today Show Website Michael Hearst About the Artist Michael Hearst Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • Ecclesiastes Cows

    Loading Video . . . In this set of images, Jonathon Roberts imagines cows sharing deep truths about the toil of work, as expressed in Ecclesiastes 3. This exploration is also inspired by a letter-turned-song from his father, a veterinarian for dairy cattle, shared in his artist statement. Ecclesiastes 3:9-22 Ecclesiastes Cows By Jonathon Roberts ​ Credits: Photo Credit: FreePhotoBank.com Artist location: New York City/Wisconsin Curated by: Spark+Echo Arts 2010 ​ ​ Digital images, satire, music Primary Scripture What profit has he who works in that in which he labors? I have seen the burden which God has given to the sons of men to be afflicted with. He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in their hearts, yet so that man can’t find out the work that God has done from the beginning even to the end. I know that there is nothing better for them than to rejoice, and to do good as long as they live. Also that every man should eat and drink, and enjoy good in all his labor, is the gift of God. I know that whatever God does, it shall be forever. Nothing can be added to it, nor anything taken from it; and God has done it, that men should fear before him. That which is has been long ago, and that which is to be has been long ago: and God seeks again that which is passed away. Moreover I saw under the sun, in the place of justice, that wickedness was there; and in the place of righteousness, that wickedness was there. I said in my heart, “God will judge the righteous and the wicked; for there is a time there for every purpose and for every work.” I said in my heart, “As for the sons of men, God tests them, so that they may see that they themselves are like animals. For that which happens to the sons of men happens to animals. Even one thing happens to them. As the one dies, so the other dies. Yes, they have all one breath; and man has no advantage over the animals: for all is vanity. All go to one place. All are from the dust, and all turn to dust again. Who knows the spirit of man, whether it goes upward, and the spirit of the animal, whether it goes downward to the earth?” Therefore I saw that there is nothing better, than that a man should rejoice in his works; for that is his portion: for who can bring him to see what will be after him? Ecclesiastes 3:9-22 Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ The way Ecclesiastes talks about meaninglessness and the toil of work has always captivated me. Around the time I was thinking about these concepts, my father, John Roberts, a veterinarian who primarily serves dairy farms, sent me a letter. He is a beautiful writer and often has poignant thoughts about his work and his life in rural northern Wisconsin. The letter turned into a song called "State of the Art Veterinarian." This got me thinking about cows and the way they stare at us, at farmers and veterinarians as they work. What are they thinking about? Do they have some sort of wisdom or insight into the meaningless and toil of work? Then, to be honest, it just really made me smile and laugh to think of cows speaking verses from Ecclesiastes. So... there you go. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ J onathon Roberts is a composer and sound designer for games, film, theatre, and ensembles. His style grew out of classical and jazz training, and evolved through quality life adventures: touring the country in an RV with a one person theater piece on the Apostle Paul, living in Brooklyn with an improv music ensemble, performing in a downtown NYC absurdist comedy band, and a long stint writing music for the renowned slot machine company, High 5 Games. He has released four albums including the latest, Cities a song cycle personifying biblical cities. He created the popular podcast/web series ComposerDad Vs. Bible , in which ComposerDad accepts intense compositional challenges from a mysterious Bible while out with his kids. He frequently collaborates on music and theater projects with his wife, actor Emily Clare Zempel. They live in Beacon, NY, with their two boys and a tangled box of electrical cords. www.jonathonroberts.com Website Jonathon Roberts About the Artist I Make Tents The Sower Response There Is Room These are My Sons Consider Me a Partner Weakness The Day Is Almost Here Surrogate Babbler Remember Me Prayer How Beautiful I Am a Fool The Constant Blessing Fools for Christ More Than Rubies Only a Few Years Will Pass Dear Friend Jonathon Roberts Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • The Genesis Project

    Loading Video . . . Focusing on the terms "image" and "subdue," composer Douglas Detrick and motion designer Kyra Odi respond to Genesis 1:27-28 in a collage of video and sound. A work looking at humanity and its role in the natural world, the piece is known as "The Genesis Project." Artists Detrick and Odi were commissioned by Spark and Echo Arts and "The Genesis Project" was premiered on June 20th, 2011 at M-1 Lounge in New York City. Genesis 1:27-28 The Genesis Project By Doug Detrick and Kyra Odi ​ Credits: Film by Kyra Odi Music by Douglas Detrick Artist Location: New York City Curated by: Jonathon 2011 ​ ​ Short Film Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ "The Genesis Project" is a nuanced statement about humanity's role in the world, about time shared with friends, about mundane times we usually forget, and about the costs of the way we live our lives. It came from our personal need to explore and come to terms with what it means when we see ourselves as created in the "image" of God and to have "dominion" over the natural world as it says in Genesis. Douglas Detrick: The project changed significantly of the course of its creation, and the only thing we knew for sure was that we were letting go of control of how the piece would turn out, letting it take shape on its own. Seeing the street scenes that Kyra had filmed encouraged a radical change in how I was hearing the music for the piece. The finished piece was quite different from what we expected, but we still feel it makes an important statement. We can't say that there are any definitive answers offered by the piece, but we do hope that the piece encourages some thought in an ongoing conversation about what our duty is to the natural world. Kyra Odi: We started at something in the beginning which was so so different from what it turned into. All I can say is that I just let go of the need to control the piece and let the subjects (people of the city) guide it as I explored our surrounding environment. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Douglas Detrick is a composer and trumpet player who resides in the Bronx, NY and was raised in Portland, Oregon. Equally at home as a performer and a composer, he creates unique music in the worlds of jazz, chamber music, electronic music and improvised music. Douglas holds degrees from the Lawrence Conservatory of Music and University of Oregon. Find out more about Douglas at DouglasDetrick.com Kyra Odi , Graphic + Interactive Communication graduate from Ringling College of Art + Design in Florida, now resides in New York as a freelance designer / animator working at a variety of companies and learning from each diverse experience. Socially inclined, she feeds off the city’s energy which she then does her best to infuse into her personal work. See more from Kyra at KyraOdi.com Kyra Odi Photo: Rasmus Keger Website Doug Detrick and Kyra Odi About the Artist Doug Detrick and Kyra Odi Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • Consider Me a Partner

    Loading Video . . . Spark+Echo Arts founder Jonathon Roberts creates a musical groove to illuminate Philemon 1:17-21. Philemon 1:17-21 Consider Me a Partner By Jonathon Roberts ​ Credits: Composition, Music and Editing by Jonathon Roberts. 2015 Vox: Emily Clare Zempel, Walter Kermit Zempel Roberts Curated by: Spark+Echo Arts 2015 ​ ​ ​ Primary Scripture If then you count me a partner, receive him as you would receive me. But if he has wronged you at all, or owes you anything, put that to my account. I, Paul, write this with my own hand: I will repay it (not to mention to you that you owe to me even your own self besides). Yes, brother, let me have joy from you in the Lord. Refresh my heart in the Lord. Having confidence in your obedience, I write to you, knowing that you will do even beyond what I say. Philemon 1:17-21 Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ While developing this work, I was mostly struck by the first phrase, "if you consider me a partner." I've been writing music and editing sound for years, first alone and then with my wife, Emily. Now we have a new partner in our life, our one-year-old Walter. Emily and I now run voiceover recording sessions at home while trading off who holds Walter and who is performing. It's a long road, but I'm learning how to be a better creative partner, both with Walter and with Emily. As I edited this piece, I tried to create a musical groove and soundscape that naturally weaves in the outbursts and exclamations that occurred when we recorded Emily performing the text. A drum hit here, a synth line there, a word or phrase got replaced with their interjections. If I "consider them partners" in my life, I need to welcome them, as Paul insists, in every way. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ J onathon Roberts is a composer and sound designer for games, film, theatre, and ensembles. His style grew out of classical and jazz training, and evolved through quality life adventures: touring the country in an RV with a one person theater piece on the Apostle Paul, living in Brooklyn with an improv music ensemble, performing in a downtown NYC absurdist comedy band, and a long stint writing music for the renowned slot machine company, High 5 Games. He has released four albums including the latest, Cities a song cycle personifying biblical cities. He created the popular podcast/web series ComposerDad Vs. Bible , in which ComposerDad accepts intense compositional challenges from a mysterious Bible while out with his kids. He frequently collaborates on music and theater projects with his wife, actor Emily Clare Zempel. They live in Beacon, NY, with their two boys and a tangled box of electrical cords. www.jonathonroberts.com Website Jonathon Roberts About the Artist I Make Tents The Sower Response There Is Room These are My Sons Weakness The Day Is Almost Here Surrogate Babbler Remember Me Prayer How Beautiful I Am a Fool The Constant Ecclesiastes Cows Blessing Fools for Christ More Than Rubies Only a Few Years Will Pass Dear Friend Jonathon Roberts Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • a transformed man

    Loading Video . . . Musician Angelo Spagnolo created this song, a transformed man, in response to Matthew 11:15-17 and the theme of "Dancing." Matthew 11:15-17 a transformed man By Angelo Spagnol ​ Credits: Written, Composed, and Performed by Angelo Spagnolo Curated by: Evan Mazunik 2013 ​ ​ ​ Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ No matter how many times Jesus talked about it in the Gospels, the Good News seemed to be something that people couldn't quite wrap their minds around. I imagine Jesus after just being raised from the dead, strapped with a headset-mic, shouting with the vigor of an aerobics instructor: "C'mon people! It's me, you see! GET UP AND DANCE!" But the people still doubted and very few of them actually end up dancing. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Angelo Spagnolo (born October 1, 1987) is an American artist who works with music, sculpture and a variety of image-making media. He is currently the composer/guitarist/singer for In One Wind and performs in Lily and the Parlour Tricks. Angelo is also an active music teacher in New York City. http://angelocspagnolo.blogspot.com/ Website ​Angelo Spagnol About the Artist ​Angelo Spagnol Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • The Second Meeting of the Betterment Society

    Loading Video . . . Playwright Mashuq Mustaq Deen explores the difficulty of drawing lines between who is righteous and who are the sinners in this short play based on Psalm 107:33-38. Psalms 107:33-38 The Second Meeting of the Betterment Society By Mashuq Mushtaq Deen ​ Credits: ​ Curated by: Chris Cragin 2015 ​ ​ One Act Play Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ The psalms that are the inspiration for The Second Meeting of the Betterment Society were about fields of plenty and the barrenness of the land, the former given to the faithful, and the latter to the sinners. This coupled well with my ongoing interest in the divide between the rural and urban parts of America, each of the opinion that the other are either idiots or heathens, and the lack of understanding that seems to flow between the two. Given our globalization, modernization, and sadly chemical-ization, I was drawn to write a story about the difficulty of drawing lines between who is the righteous and who are the sinners based on the simplicity of who has the fertility of land, and who is losing their fertility (or giving up their fertility). Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Mashuq Mushtaq Deen’s plays include The Shaking Earth, Draw the Circle, Tank & Horse, and Shut Up! Deen’s plays have been produced and/or developed by The Public Theater, NYTW, InterAct Theatre, Page73, Ma-Yi, Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, Georgetown University, BEAT Festival, PACE University, Hampshire College, Dixon Place, Passage Theatre, Queens Theatre in the Park, Tofte Lake Center, Berkshire Fringe. Awards and fellowships include: New Dramatists Company Member, MacDowell Fellow, Bogliasco Foundation Residency (2016), Helene Wurlitzer Foundation Residency (2016), NYFA, NYTW 2050 Fellow, Public Theater EWG, Page73 Interstate writing group, Jerome New York Fellowship finalist, O’Neill Conference semifinalist, Weissberger Award nomination, James Baldwin Award, Dennis Johnston Playwriting Prize honorable mention. He has been a teaching artist with the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council (SPARC Fellow), Community Voices Workshop with Second Generation Theatre, Mind the Gap (NYTW), and is currently on the Literary Committee of Queens Theatre. Member: NYTW Usual Suspect, Ma-Yi Writers Lab, Public Theater Alumni Writers Group, Dramatists Guild. Deen earned his MFA from the Actors Studio Drama School/New School for Drama. Website ​Mashuq Mushtaq Deen About the Artist ​Mashuq Mushtaq Deen Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

  • Stripped to the Bonemeal

    Loading Video . . . This thought-provoking poem written by Lancelot Schaubert challenges readers to imagine the world after capitalism has fallen, which is in response to Amos 6: 1-14. Amos 6:1-14 Stripped to the Bonemeal By Lancelot Schaubert ​ Credits: Illumination Representation Image by Lancelot Shaubert with Ai on Midjourney Curated by: Spark+Echo Arts 2022 ​ ​ Poetry Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ I focused on the alliterative meter for this piece to give a sort of Old English Beowulf or Nordic ire. Most of the Hebrew ire is lost on us. I hoped an epic meter would round this out. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Lancelot has sold work to The New Haven Review (The Institute Library), The Anglican Theological Review, TOR (MacMillan), McSweeney's, The Poet's Market, Writer's Digest, and many, many similar markets. (His favorite, a rather risqué piece, illuminated bankroll management by prison inmates in the World Series Edition of Poker Pro). Publisher's Weekly called his debut novel BELL HAMMERS "a hoot." He has lectured on these at academic conferences, graduate classes, and nerd conventions in Nashville, Portland, Baltimore, Tarrytown, NYC, Joplin, and elsewhere. The Missouri Tourism Bureau, WRKR, Flying Treasure, 9art, The Brooklyn Film Festival, NYC Indie Film Fest, Spiva Center for the Arts, The Institute of the North in Alaska, and the Chicago Museum of Photography have all worked with him as a film producer and director in various capacities. Website Lancelot Schaubert About the Artist Posh Girls As Waters Cover Artist in Residence 2019: Lancelot Schaubert Dragonsmaw Daily | 1 Dragonsmaw Daily | 2 Dragonsmaw Daily | 3 Watchtower Metaphysical Insurance Claim 0075A: The Delphic Oracle Philadelphia Bloodlines Lancelot Schaubert Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art Time will come when the tyrants wane, When Cape Cod will be encased in ice Frozen like the final fires of hell View Full Written Work STRIPPED TO THE BONEMEAL By Lancelot Schaubert Time will come when the tyrants wane, When Cape Cod will be encased in ice Frozen like the final fires of hell Where the tears of the taker confine. To these Bible Belt complacent we say WOE — To Lexington’s healthy horse breeders, To Houston’s oil oligarchs and their wives, To St. Louis’s stealers of farms (The corn mutants of Monsanto fiefs), To Indy’s hoarders of insulin patents, And redlining real-estate Brokers spread like a patina of SPAM — We say woe to you wicked Christians. You feel secure in the coastless heights. For Saudi and Iraq, for the Soviets and China. For Mexico City and Singapore. For Japan and Uganda, for Polynesia and Sweden. Are they so much worse for wear to insult? Are you so better off than these beautiful places? And there will be time for The End to anguish greed. When your lapis lazuli La-Z-Boys® Fold inward in a fractured heap, When the mojitos you inhale dockside Slip in your sweat and shatter on deck, When your Golden Globes gilded in Peru mines Tarnish by your misinvoiced trade policies, When your Powers That Be lose your power in three Carefully placed hurricanes, When your poor will be seen, empowered and whole. Enjoy your tours of juniper spirits, Foodie reviews and festivals of music. Enjoy your Costco wine and calves. Your people — your poor — lie in ruin. And because of that: America ain’t great. "If the civility of a society’s what you want to size, Take a deeper look at its prisons.” —Dostoevsky The meal will get stripped to the bonemeal. The lounge will stiffen, so languishes the sex, And the market crashes making you the poor And not merely the poor in meek spirit. When your pride is ended, you will ask this: How did the meek shall inherit the earth? Close Loading Video . . . Time will come when the tyrants wane, When Cape Cod will be encased in ice Frozen like the final fires of hell Download Full Written Work

  • Oil Monster

    Oil Monster Katrina Zezza Loading Video . . . Artist and theologian Katrina Ross illuminates the timeless words of Revelation 13:1-2 with a lens of today's potential context. Revelation 13:1-2 Oil Monster By Katrina Ross ​ Credits: ​ Curated by: Spark+Echo Arts 2020 ​ ​ Pen + Photoshop Primary Scripture Loading primary passage... Loading Passage Reference... Share This Art: Facebook X (Twitter) WhatsApp LinkedIn Pinterest Copy Link ​ Illuminating this passage was challenging for me, because of how it has been used to terrorize and demonize groups of people, but I chose it because I've always loved drawing giant monsters. There are a variety of interpretations for the "beasts" described in the Book of Revelation, but it is widely thought that the beasts are meant to represent religious and economic powers within society which persuade people to pledge their allegiance to institutional powers, often at the expense of what is good and right. In its original context, the beast of the sea was likely a subversive reference to the imperial cult of Rome and specifically Emperor Nero who was a notoriously brutal and unjust persecutor. However, this story has found its way into the narrative of other battles and culture wars since. As with most Bible stories, Revelation can be used to justify almost any worldview. The beast can become whatever you find most threatening or what you see as the greatest evil of our time, but I think it is important to keep God's faithfulness in mind as we interpret scripture. I find it especially troubling when the beast is said to represent marginalized groups because this text was written to give people hope for justice in the face of institutionalized cruelty, not to further subjugate the powerless. Lately, I've been thinking about how theology is used to uphold unjust systems of power. For our context, I think the beast of the sea would more appropriately symbolize wealth inequality, systemic injustice and corporate greed. The seven heads of the beast, said to be seven emperors who formed the Roman Empire, might today be the seven "supermajors" of Big Oil whose influence disproportionately controls political and economic direction worldwide. I think this story, found in the Book of Revelation, is about God's witness to the oppressive forces in our world, which will be overcome in God's time and with our compassionate action. Spark Notes The Artist's Reflection ​ Katrina Ross is currently an M.Div student at Union Theological Seminary in New York City, and she has also worked as a freelance graphic designer and artist for many years. She draws things using ink, water-based paints and digital applications. Katrina’s inspiration is often derived from things she thinks she saw, or symbols that want to be reconfigured. She tries to avoid explicit narrative to leave room for a range of experiences, because your contribution as the viewer is central to the meaning. Website: katrinaross.net Blog: katrinaross.blogspot.com Website Katrina Ross About the Artist Samuel and Time Travel Katrina Ross Other Works By Related Information View More Art Make More Art ​ View Full Written Work Close Loading Video . . . ​ Download Full Written Work

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