Spark and Echo Arts is pleased to feature the work Abram, a sculpture by artist Ebitenyefa Baralaye. This captivating piece is Mr. Baralaye’s reflection on the life of Abram, especially what is told in Genesis 12:2-3 and Acts 7:3.

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From the Artist:

This piece was modeled from water clay, fired and then cast in bronze. Its textured surface and gestural form reflects the clay’s original malleability under aggressive tactile and tooled handling. It was composed from two main sections that were complimentarily stacked and worked together.

In the Old Testament, Abram is ordained by God as the lineage father of all of God’s body of chosen people, Israel. He is blessed, sent on a journey to a Promised Land and later receives the name Abraham, “father of many nations.”

This form loosely reflects: at its top, Abram’s faithfully singular focus of mind, further down, the dispersion of his lineage to descendants of many nations, and from mid-section to base, the challenges endured and overcome through his life’s steadfast journey.

Abram
Ebitenyefa Baralaye
Nickel-plated polished bronze
8.5 in x 10 in x 21 in
2010

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Acts 7:3 and Genesis 12:2-3
“The LORD had said to Abram, “Leave your country, your people and your father’s household and go to the land I will show you.”

“I will make you into a great nation and I will bless you; I will make your name great, and you will be a blessing. I will bless those who bless you, and whoever curses you I will curse; and all peoples on earth will be blessed through you.”

Visit www.Baralaye.com
We encourage you to visit Mr. Baralaye’s website to learn about his many works in areas of sculpture, photography, design, and drawing. You can also read about his background, seeing how the arts have woven through his early childhood in the Caribbean straight to his work today in New York City. Mr. Baralaye is a member of the arts community at the Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts in Manhattan.

This work and accompanying images are copyrighted by Ebitenyefa Baralaye and featured here by permission. If you are interested in this work or using the images please contact Mr. Baralaye directly via his website.

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Filed under: New WorksVisuals